Interview with Bedford’s daughter, Valda

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Valda:
He didn’t want a boy. Mother always said that when
Bobbie turned out to be a girl they both said they wanted the
first one to be a boy. When Bobbie turned out to be a girl Daddy
decided that she needed a sister and then each time Mother was
expecting a baby she’d say maybe this one would be a boy. And
he’s say no, I don’t want a boy, I want another girl. He got
what he wanted.
And when he was in Konawa he was one of the leading citizens. He
owned a blacksmith shop and a gristmill and of course put in the
first gasoline pump that was there. But, the things that I
remember about him were, like, some man would come up to the
door, oh, say late at night, and say “Mr. Burton, can you have
some of my shears, I’ve got to plow some of my fields in the
morning and I don’t think these will make it. And Daddy would
pull out his — well he had a metal lathe, I guess you‘d call it —
and he’d get out his supply of leather, and his knives and he‘d
sit there with his hammer and the next thing you know the man
would walk out and say “I’ll pay you when I get the crops in Mr.
Burton“ and people used to come day and say “Mr. Burton can you
help us kill hogs tomorrow?“ And it seems that the whole
neighborhood would get together to butcher the hogs. And he’d
usually come in with a big tub full of meat that Mother would
have to process, and she wasn’t always happy about that. But we
always had plenty of meat, and plenty of sausage and cured… we
had a smoke house out at the end of the back porch.

Do you know where they met before they got married?

Valda:
Heavens, no. I assume right there in Naylor. I know
that. let me see, what was his name?, … we had a Colonel when
Lud and I were in the army and stationed in Little Rock…Mother
came to visit us and said “I wonder if Goldberg Graham” that was
his name, “is still in the army.” And she called somebody in
Little Rock and they said “yes, he was stationed. he was right
there in Little Rock and was camped there at Joseph T. Robinson.
So we went to some big party…I don’t know ..we took mother
along, and he was there, he and his wife. And they were very
friendly and very congenial. And when we got home Mother said
“He told everybody in Naylor he was going to marry me, said his
sister told everybody too.” So, I said “why didn’t you?” She
said. “Look what I would have been stuck with!“ So, oh and
Graham in reminiscing that night he said “your mother always
laughed at me because I aspired to be more than a Naylorite.“ He
said “I always wore silk socks and she always thought I was
putton on airs.” Of course that wasn‘t true.

 

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